Opioids and Benzodiazepines Prescribed More Frequently in the South

August 25th, 2014

Janaburson’s Blog (8/25/14): Last month, the CDC released information comparing rates of opioid and benzodiazepine prescriptions by state and by region. It did not surprise me to learn the South had the highest rates of benzodiazepine and opioid prescribing of the entire nation.

Alabama, Tennessee, and West Virginia were the top three prescribers for both opioid and benzodiazepines. We already know that higher prescribing rates are associated with higher overdose deaths rates from these medications. Incredibly, these three states were more than two standard deviations away from mean prescribing rates for the entire country.

The CDC authors of this report admit it’s unlikely there’s much difference in rates of disorders needing treatment with opioids or benzodiazepines. My interpretation of this statement is that it’s an indirect way of saying doctors in the South are overprescribing opioids and benzodiazepines. The authors allude to the problem of overprescribing in the South, mentioning that the South also has higher rates of prescribing for antibiotics, stimulants in children, and medications known to be high risk for the elderly.

How did my state of North Carolina compare to the rest of the nation? Our data isn’t as embarrassing as that for Tennessee, but there’s certainly room for improvement. In NC, doctors prescribed around 97 opioid prescriptions per 100 people, and 45 benzo prescriptions per 100 people.

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